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Discord certified moderator как получить

Discord certified moderator как получить

‍Editor’s Note: The info in this blog post is outdated! For the latest information on the Discord Moderator Academy, please visit https://discord.com/moderation.

Moderators play one of the most important roles on Discord: helping keep servers and the communities they hold safe. They’re often the unsung heroes who go above and beyond and make communities on Discord what they are.

Moderating a community on Discord means much more than wielding your mighty ban hammer and smiting those who mean to do harm: it means being responsible for fostering a space where you, your friends, and potentially hundreds of others can find belonging.

Many times, moderators are one of the first people to greet you when you join a community, making you feel at home as soon as you enter. The list of multi-faceted responsibilities that a good Discord moderator takes on, including running events and making sure the community runs smoothly, can be endless, and sometimes, thankless.

In our continued efforts to recognize and celebrate Discord’s most accomplished and capable community moderators, we are introducing the Certified Discord Moderator Badge!

Did You Say… a New Badge?

Yes, a new profile badge! As the uncle of a certain web-slinging hero once said, with great power comes great responsibility. As both community leaders and protectors of the realm, mods hold a lot of power within their respective Discords.

The Certified Discord Moderator badge is just a small portion of our grand plan to recognize and support those who have a direct hand in making communities on Discord the unique and amazing places we all know they are.

We want to recognize the expertise and efforts that some of our best moderators have made to help tell the world they’re one of the most experienced admins and mods on the platform with the brand new Certified Discord Moderator badge, seen below:

This badge is awarded to moderators who can prove they’re the real deal. A Certified Discord Moderator is familiar with Discord’s rules and guidelines inside and out, an expert at throwing the best server events, and above all, an exemplary image of a community leader and moderator on Discord.

You may be thinking at this point “well, I’m doin’ a pretty good job moderating my server. I do all the things that a good moderator does, my members are pretty happy and my community could not be healthier. How do I get qualified for one of these shiny new badges?” Glad you asked.

Becoming a Certified Discord Moderator

There’s a lot that goes into being a great moderator — it’s a complicated position where you have to sometimes wear a lot of different hats and wear them equally well.

In some communities, the moderation team spreads out their mods into individual roles based upon their skillset. There may be a moderator that manages the team’s auto-mod bots, or a moderator that’s better at organizing hype game nights for the community to rally around.

Just because you don’t do it all, all at once, doesn’t mean that you aren’t eligible or qualified to be a Certified Discord Moderator. Being a great moderator is not a one-size-fits-all kind of job, so the application to be recognized for your expertise isn’t one either.

The journey to being a Certified Discord Moderator involves a few different steps, including some steps where we’ll be able to evaluate your skills on a more holistic basis to truly let you demonstrate your moderation prowess.

The requirements for the Certified Discord Moderator badge are as follows:
‍

  • ‍Study theDiscord Moderator Academy: The Discord Moderator Academy (DMA) is a resource chock-full of moderation and community building wisdom compiled by mods, for mods. Content in the DMA makes for a solid foundation of moderation knowledge that any Certified Discord Moderator should be familiar with.
    ‍
  • ‍Take the Discord Moderator Academy Exam: Have you read the Discord Moderator Academy articles back to front? Left to right? Side to side? Cross-cross? Think you have a solid grasp on the ins and outs of the topics covered by the extensive catalog of moderation mentorship?
    ‍
    Take the Discord Moderator Academy Exam and see how your moderation know-how stacks up, which you can find within any Discord Moderator Academy article. This exam pulls directly from the materials presented in the Moderator Academy and is meant to challenge your decision-making skills and understanding of important moderation practices. Pass this test and you’ll get an invite to…
    ‍
  • ‍Join the Discord Moderator Community: We’ve mentioned this server in our previous moderation-centric blog post and we’re finally opening it up to moderators who pass the Discord Moderator Academy exam. In short, it’s a server where some of Discord’s best moderators can exchange knowledge, provide peer support, and discuss the finer points of what it really takes to run a safe and successful server.
    ‍
    Within the Discord Moderator Discord, you’ll have opportunities to interact with both the Trust & Safety Team and Engineers who are interested in receiving direct feedback on projects and upcoming features. You may even have the chance to write an article for a future update to the Discord Moderator Academy and share your own expertise in our lexicon of mod wisdom.
    ‍
  • ‍Become an Active, Engaged, and Contributing Member of the Discord Moderator Discord: The Discord Moderator Discord (on Discord) is an incredible hub and resource for anyone who’s passionate about furthering their skills and becoming an even stronger moderator.

It’s also a community — it’s not enough to just join the server, mute it, and forget about it forever. By joining the Discord Moderator Discord, you’re joining in on a collaborative effort with your moderation peers to not only level up yourself, but to advance the state of moderation on Discord as a whole.

Discord’s Community Moderation Team takes note of who’s actively engaging with their fellow members, and who’s participating in conversations around the server that demonstrate an eagerness to share their moderation experience and a desire for sharpening their moderation toolkit.

Active and engaged community members of the Discord Moderator Discord who demonstrate these traits for at least three months are eligible (but not guaranteed) to receive the Certified Discord Moderator badge.

This contribution doesn’t have a strict set of requirements. It’s not a list of things to mark off a checkbox to automatically get a badge. Just do what people do best on Discord: be a part of a community centered around a specific topic that you all are passionate about. In this case, moderation.
‍

What comes next

Even if you don’t pass the exam the first go around, the process of reading through the Mod Academy and learning from your mistakes can be a catalyst for growth as a moderator. Being a part of the Discord Moderator Discord opens a whole network of not only invaluable educational resources, but moderator camaraderie and the opportunity to learn from first-hand experiences of the best moderators on the platform.

Along with the badge, the Discord Moderator Academy will receive its first batch of new content later this year, so keep an eye out there and on the Changelog for updates — we’re working on new resource formats and new ways to stay in-the-know about all things moderation on Discord.

We can’t wait to see you demonstrate your moderation chops on the exam, chat with you about how to properly get a server event started, and watch you earn your Certified Discord Moderator Badge.

Perhaps we’ll catch you on the Discord Moderator Discord soon, future Certified Moderator!

Источник статьи: http://discord.com/blog/announcing-our-latest-profile-badge-the-certified-discord-moderator

Introduction

The content of the Discord Moderator Academy is organized based on complexity. Articles start with the basics, and the later articles are some of the most advanced topics moderators may face. Here is the breakdown:

100: Basics

These resources help answer basic questions on how to build and moderate a community, whether they are brand new to Discord or need some helpful reminders.

200: Setup and Function

Once the foundation is set, it is time to make your community even more enticing by leveraging Discord’s features to manage moderation processes and your team, and to build a compelling community full of interesting channels and events to participate in.

300: Advanced Community Management

Expert moderators face challenges too! These resources are for anyone seeking to learn more about the intricacies of community management and making sound moderation decisions.

Separate instructional & verification channels

@everyone role

✔ Read Messages in both channels

❌ Add Reactions in both channels
✔ Read Message History in instructional

❌ Send Messages in instructional

✔ Send Messages in verification
❌ Read Message History in verification

❌ Read Messages in both channels

❌ Add Reactions in both channels

Combined channel
@everyone role

✔ Read Messages
✔ Read Message History

Separate instructional & verification channels

@everyone role

✔ Read Messages in both channels

❌ Add Reactions in both channels
✔ Read Message History in instructional

❌ Send Messages in instructional

✔ Send Messages in verification
❌ Read Message History in verification

❌ Read Messages in both channels

❌ Add Reactions in both channels

Combined channel
@everyone role

✔ Read Messages
✔ Read Message History*

*Unless you are using the channel description for verification instructions rather than an automatic greeter message.

If you want to use the remove unverified role method, you will need a bot that can automatically assign a role to a user when they join.

Verification Actions
Once you decide whether you want to add or remove a role, you need to decide how you want that action to take place. Generally, this is done by typing a bot command in a channel, typing a bot command in a DM, or clicking on a reaction. The differences between these methods are shown below.

In order to use the command in channel method, you will need to instruct your users to remove the Unverified role or to add the Verified role to themselves.

400: Moderation Seminars

Advanced content for deep dives into moderation that address overarching philosophy and strategy.

Markdown is also supported in an embed. Here is an image to showcase an example of these properties:

Example image to showcase the elements of an embed
An important thing to note is that embeds also have their limitations, which are set by the API. Here are some of the most important ones you need to know:

An important thing to note is that embeds also have their limitations, which are set by the API. Here are some of the most important ones you need to know:

  • Embed titles are limited to 256 characters
  • Embed descriptions are limited to 2048 characters
  • There can be up to 25 fields
  • The name of a field is limited to 256 characters and its value to 1024 characters
  • The footer text is limited to 2048 characters
  • The author name is limited to 256 characters
  • In addition, the sum of all characters in an embed structure must not exceed 6000 characters
  • A webhook can have 10 embeds per message
  • A webhook can only send 30 messages per minute

If you feel like experimenting even further you should take a look at the full list of limitations provided by Discord here.

It’s very important to keep in mind that when you are writing an embed, it should be in JSON format. Some bots even provide an embed visualizer within their dashboards. You can also use this embed visualizer tool which provides visualization for bot and webhook embeds.

500: Graduate Courses

For those interested in learning about concepts that go beyond the scope of moderation in practice. Delve into the realm of community dynamics and moderation in academic abstract.

Author Credits

The Discord Moderator Academy was carefully constructed by many moderators in collaboration with Discord. Check out the credits for acknowledgments.

  • New members joining decreases
  • Total membership over time grows more slowly or decreases
  • Total joins from the invite link/referrer decreases
  • New members joining increases
  • Total membership over time increases more quickly or decreases more slowly
  • Total joins from the invite link/referrer increases
  • Members remain on your server after joining, decreasing server leaves over time from new members
  • Members are more likely to want to engage with your server prior to joining, and will be more likely to talk or visit multiple channels
  • Can only send messages to a set channel.
  • They can only send messages, not view any.
  • Can send up to 10 embeds per message.
  • Much more flexible as they can do more complex actions similar to what a regular user can do.
  • Bots are able to view and send messages.
  • Only one embed per message is allowed.
  • Can create 10 webhooks per server with the ability to customize each avatar and name.
  • Able to hyperlink any text outside of an embed.
  • Public bots often have a preset avatar and name which cannot be modified by end users.
  • Cannot hyperlink any text in a normal message, must use an embed.
  • Just an endpoint to send data to, no actual hosting is required.
  • No authentication that data sent to webhook is from a trusted source.
  • No authentication that data sent to webhook is from a trusted source.If webhook URL is leaked, only non-permanent problems may occur (e.g. spamming)
  • Easy to change webhook URL if needed.
  • Bots have to be hosted in a secure environment that will need to be kept online all the time, which costs more resources.
  • Bots are authenticated via a token, compromised token can cause severe damage due to their capabilities if they have permissions granted to them by the server owner.
  • However, you can reset the bot token if needed.

Even though this comparison is important for better understanding of both bots and webhooks, it does not mean you should limit yourself to only picking one or the other. Sometimes, bots and webhooks work their best when working together. It’s not uncommon for bots to use webhooks for logging purposes or to distinguish notable messages with a custom avatar and name for that message. Both tools are essential for a server to function properly and make for a powerful combination.

*Unconfigurable filters, these will catch all instances of the trigger, regardless of whether they’re spammed or a single instance

**Gaius also offers an additional NSFW filter as well as standard image spam filtering

***YAGPDB offers link verification via google, anything flagged as unsafe can be removed

****Giselle combines Fast Messages and Repeated Text into one filter

Anti-Spam is integral to running a large private server, or a public server. Spam, by definition, is irrelevant or unsolicited messages. This covers a wide base of things on Discord, there are multiple types of spam a user can engage in. The common forms are listed in the table above. The most common forms of spam are also very typical of raids, those being Fast Messages and Repeated Text. The nature of spam can vary greatly but the vast majority of instances involve a user or users sending lots of messages with the same contents with the intent of disrupting your server.

There are subsets of this spam that many anti-spam filters will be able to catch. If any of the following: Mentions, Links, Invites, Emoji, and Newline Text are spammed repeatedly in one message or spammed repeatedly across several messages, they will provoke most Repeated Text and Fast Messages filters appropriately. Subset filters are still a good thing for your anti-spam filter to contain as you may wish to punish more or less harshly depending on the spam. Namely, Emoji and Links may warrant separate punishments. Spamming 10 links in a single message is inherently worse than having 10 emoji in a message.

Anti-spam will only act on these things contextually, usually in an X in Y fashion where if a user sends, for example, 10 links in 5 seconds, they will be punished to some degree. This could be 10 links in one message, or 1 link in 10 messages. In this respect, some anti-spam filters can act simultaneously as Fast Messages and Repeated Text filters.

Sometimes, spam may happen too quickly for a bot to catch up. There are rate limits in place to stop bots from harming servers that can prevent deletion of individual messages if those messages are being sent too quickly. This can often happen in raids. As such, Fast Messages filters should prevent offenders from sending messages; this can be done via a mute, kick or ban. If you want to protect your server from raids, please read on to the Anti-Raid section of this article.

Text Filters
Text filters allow you to control the types of words and/or links that people are allowed to put in your server. Different bots will provide various ways to filter these things, keeping your chat nice and clean.

*Defaults to banning ALL links

**YAGPDB offers link verification via google, anything flagged as unsafe can be removed

***Setting a catch-all filter with carl will prevent link-specific spam detection

A text filter is integral to a well moderated server. It’s strongly, strongly recommended you use a bot that can filter text based on a blacklist. A Banned words filter can catch links and invites provided http:// and https:// are added to the word blacklist (for all links) or specific full site URLs to block individual websites. In addition, discord.gg can be added to a blacklist to block ALL Discord invites.

A Banned Words filter is integral to running a public server, especially if it’s a Partnered, Community or Verified server, as this level of auto moderation is highly recommended for the server to adhere to the additional guidelines attached to it. Before configuring a filter, it’s a good idea to work out what is and isn’t ok to say in your server, regardless of context. For example, racial slurs are generally unacceptable in almost all servers, regardless of context. Banned word filters often won’t account for context, with an explicit blacklist. For this reason, it’s also important a robust filter also contains whitelisting options. For example, if you add the slur ‘nig’ to your filter and someone mentions the country Nigeria’ they could get in trouble for using an otherwise acceptable word.

Filter immunity may also be important to your server, as there may be individuals who need to discuss the use of banned words, namely members of a moderation team. There may also be channels that allow the usage of otherwise banned words. For example, a serious channel dedicated to discussion of real world issues may require discussions about slurs or other demeaning language, in this exception channel based Immunity is integral to allowing those conversations.

Link filtering is important to servers where sharing links in ‘general’ chats isn’t allowed, or where there are specific channels for sharing such things. This can allow a server to remove links with an appropriate reprimand without treating a transgression with the same severity as they would a user sending a racial slur.

Whitelisting/Blacklisting and templates for links are also a good idea to have. While many servers will use catch-all filters to make sure links stay in specific channels, some links will always be malicious. As such, being able to filter specific links is a good feature, with preset filters (Like the google filter provided by YAGPDB) coming in very handy for protecting your user base without intricate setup however, it is recommended you do configure a custom filter to ensure specific slurs, words etc. that break the rules of your server, aren’t being said.

Invite filtering is equally important in large or public servers where users will attempt to raid, scam or otherwise assault your server with links with the intention of manipulating your user base to join or where unsolicited self-promotion is potentially fruitful. Filtering allows these invites to be recognized, and dealt with more harshly. Some bots may also allow by-server white/blacklisting allowing you to control which servers are ok to share invites to, and which aren’t. A good example of invite filtering usage would be something like a partners channel, where invites to other, closely linked, servers are shared. These servers should be added to an invite whitelist to prevent their deletion.

Anti-Raid
Raids, as defined earlier in this article, are mass-joins of users (often selfbots) with the intent of damaging your server. There are a few methods available to you in order for you to protect your community from this behavior. One method involves gating your server with verification appropriately, as discussed in DMA 301.You can also supplement or supplant the need for verification by using a bot that can detect and/or prevent damage from raids.

Источник статьи: http://discord.com/moderation/introduction

What is the Discord Moderator Academy?

Discord is a special place because of all of the amazing communities where people find those with similar interests, form friendships, and create belonging. These communities are built and cared for by moderators, who make sure these servers grow and flourish while making sure the community held within is healthy and safe.

The Discord Moderator Academy (DMA) was created to empower those moderators to lead more effectively, manage teams, and learn more about the tools needed to help foster their communities. DMA is a collection of resources written by moderators of some of Discord’s most prominent communities.

The amount of content continues to grow, now consisting of over three dozen articles carefully crafted by moderators across the platform, each bringing their expertise on a wide variety of different challenging topics. We built the Moderator Academy as a comprehensive resource so anyone, from first-time mods of smaller servers to experienced veterans of massive online communities, can find resources to learn about moderation, community management and more.

What happens when I pass the exam?

Those who pass the DMA Exam will be eligible to apply to join Discord’s growing moderator ecosystem of communities — users 18+ can join the Discord Moderator Discord, while users between the ages of 13–17 can join the Moderator Mentorship Community. Both of these servers are a growing community of passionate moderators on the platform to discuss all things moderation.

As the center of community moderation for Discord, both servers foster discussions about community moderation, leadership and administration, and server development on Discord. Discuss all things moderation, product features, Trust & Safety and Policy, and more. You’ll find the platform’s best moderators, bot devs, scholars and researchers, and even Discord engineers and product managers, Trust & Safety members, and policy experts. They’re people who help imagine, build, maintain, and grow the most amazing communities on the platform, and the internet as a whole — and you can be a part of it all.

In Discord’s moderator servers, moderators build connections with each other, showcase community accomplishments, offer their own moderation opportunities, seek out help with challenging moderation issues and learn about moderation tools. You can even step back and think about what it truly means to be a community moderator by discussing moderation philosophy, hypotheticals, and the practicalities of community management.

There are regular meetings about moderation on Discord, sneak peeks at upcoming Discord features, and the chance to hear from teams across the company on what they’re working on. You can even help offer ideas for product features — we’re right there to listen.

Where can I take the exam?

When you’re ready to be tested, the exam is accessible from any article within the Discord Moderator Academy. We recommend reading through all the articles before taking the exam — take some time to find a quiet spot and set aside an hour to take on the exam. You can also find it here.

The exam consists of multiple-choice questions, as well as short answer questions on hypothetical situations, moderation policy, as well as some questions about your moderation experience and the communities you moderate. Completed tests are hand-reviewed by our Trust & Safety team, so make sure it’s in good shape when you hit submit.

We wish you the best of luck on the Moderator Exam! рџ“ќ

Источник статьи: http://discord.com/blog/announcing-the-discord-moderator-academy-exam

151: An Intro to the Moderator Ecosystem

Discord is home to a diverse set of communities that cater to a wide range of interests, and moderation serves as the backbone of any community. With this in mind, Discord has developed an ecosystem of programs and resources to facilitate the advancement of moderation and moderation practices on the platform.

The Discord Moderator Ecosystem was created by Discord with contributions from both moderators within Discord as well as users outside of the company. Created to bring together moderators with interests in user safety and community management, it has branched off into several programs and subprograms that each serve various purposes. This article will introduce readers to the ecosystem and explain what the branches are about.

Programs of the Ecosystem

The Moderator Ecosystem consists of two main programs that are known as the Discord Moderator Discord (DMD) and the Moderator Mentorship Community (MMC).

These programs focus on different things and target different audiences which we will cover later in the article. But overall, they share a very similar goal: they each provide a place for their members to engage in, talk about, or discuss everything about moderation, community management, and administration in an online environment. In both communities there are a variety of opportunities to be explored.

Discord Moderator Discord

Our first stop is the Discord Moderator Discord or the DMD—the first and main community of the entire ecosystem. Moderators who have passed the Discord Moderator Academy Exam and are over the age of 18 can join this server.

Serving as a forum for experienced moderators to discuss moderation philosophy, theory, and practicality, people from across the ecosystem, such as Moderator Mentorship Community Mentors can be found here. Both moderators and Discord’s own Trust & Safety, Engineering, Product, and other teams frequently participate in discussions here pertaining to new and existing platform features and understanding moderation needs. You will have opportunities to interact with teams that are eager to receive direct feedback on projects and upcoming features, especially on how those features will affect your jobs as moderators.

This is also the hub for all things related to the Discord Moderator Academy (DMA). You can brainstorm ideas for future articles, proofread ones that are already written before they enter the editing pipeline, share feedback about published pieces, and contribute your moderation knowhow to our ever growing resource.

Moderator Mentorship Community

The Moderator Mentorship Community was born out of the DMD when we recognized a need to help guide younger moderators looking to learn more about what moderation entails. The challenges that younger moderators face may be different from that of more experienced or older moderators, and so this community was formed to address and provide resources for our younger moderators. This server is a safe space for moderators between the ages of 13 and 17 to be mentored by more experienced moderators all there is to know about the realities of running online communities. The mentors are selected from applicants from within the DMD seeking to help others learn. The MMC’s primary goal is to focus on the professional growth and polishing of younger moderators’ skills in a controlled and curated environment with an emphasis on education and growth.

Resources and Subprograms

Within our three main Discord programs, you may also find resources and subprograms. These include Discord Moderator Academy and Moderator Mentors which exist to support the overarching goals of the ecosystem.

Discord Moderator Academy

We’ve previously mentioned the DMA already—in fact, your reading of this very article is part of the beginning stages of your journey into the ecosystem. The Discord Moderator Academy is the first place to look when starting out on your moderation level-up journey. This is a living, growing public resource full of moderation and community-building wisdom made by moderators for moderators to share their knowledge and experience with the rest of the community. The content in the DMA makes for a solid foundation of moderation knowledge ranging from technical setup, community building, rules and regulations, and interpersonal relationship management.

If you’re interested in joining the Discord Moderator Ecosystem, you must first pass the Discord Moderator Academy Exam that is based off of the articles and content shared in the DMA. Its purpose is to test your knowledge of moderation in general and specifics tied to the articles within. Passing this may allow you to join either the Discord Moderator Discord or the Moderator Mentorship Community, depending upon your age.

Moderator Mentors

The Moderator Mentors serve as a critical element of the MMC. These mentors are the foundation of the community and help pave the way for future generations of moderators to build a safer online world. To become a moderator mentor for the MMC, you will have to be at least 18 years old and be an active and positive contributing member of the DMD with the time and interest to help nurture younger moderators.

Discord Certified Moderator Badge

In the summer of 2021, Discord introduced a new profile badge called the Discord Certified Moderator badge.

As we all know, moderators play an essential role within servers on the platform, ensuring the safety of all the communities they protect. They are often the unsung heroes who go above and beyond the call of duty. Responsible for not only keeping their users safe but also for engaging their audiences and talking about the topics within servers to keep the gears turning, Discord introduced the badge to recognize the expertise and efforts that some of its best moderators have made in their efforts to help keep Discord a great place to be safe and to belong. Users with this badge are considered positive and impactful moderators within the aforementioned ecosystem, and thus Discord has certified them as volunteer moderators.

Separate instructional & verification channels

@everyone role

✔ Read Messages in both channels

❌ Add Reactions in both channels
✔ Read Message History in instructional

❌ Send Messages in instructional

✔ Send Messages in verification
❌ Read Message History in verification

❌ Read Messages in both channels

❌ Add Reactions in both channels

Combined channel
@everyone role

✔ Read Messages
✔ Read Message History

Separate instructional & verification channels

@everyone role

✔ Read Messages in both channels

❌ Add Reactions in both channels
✔ Read Message History in instructional

❌ Send Messages in instructional

✔ Send Messages in verification
❌ Read Message History in verification

❌ Read Messages in both channels

❌ Add Reactions in both channels

Combined channel
@everyone role

✔ Read Messages
✔ Read Message History*

*Unless you are using the channel description for verification instructions rather than an automatic greeter message.

If you want to use the remove unverified role method, you will need a bot that can automatically assign a role to a user when they join.

Verification Actions
Once you decide whether you want to add or remove a role, you need to decide how you want that action to take place. Generally, this is done by typing a bot command in a channel, typing a bot command in a DM, or clicking on a reaction. The differences between these methods are shown below.

In order to use the command in channel method, you will need to instruct your users to remove the Unverified role or to add the Verified role to themselves.

Conclusion

The Discord Moderator Ecosystem consists of different programs that work together to create a carefully cultivated environment where passionate users can learn from one another and bond over a shared respect for online moderation and all it encompasses. This ecosystem is just one part of Discord’s support of educational efforts for online safety and moderation.

Begin your journey to joining the ecosystem by reading through the Discord Moderator Academy and taking the exam to have a chance to enter these programs yourself!

Markdown is also supported in an embed. Here is an image to showcase an example of these properties:

Example image to showcase the elements of an embed
An important thing to note is that embeds also have their limitations, which are set by the API. Here are some of the most important ones you need to know:

An important thing to note is that embeds also have their limitations, which are set by the API. Here are some of the most important ones you need to know:

  • Embed titles are limited to 256 characters
  • Embed descriptions are limited to 2048 characters
  • There can be up to 25 fields
  • The name of a field is limited to 256 characters and its value to 1024 characters
  • The footer text is limited to 2048 characters
  • The author name is limited to 256 characters
  • In addition, the sum of all characters in an embed structure must not exceed 6000 characters
  • A webhook can have 10 embeds per message
  • A webhook can only send 30 messages per minute

If you feel like experimenting even further you should take a look at the full list of limitations provided by Discord here.

It’s very important to keep in mind that when you are writing an embed, it should be in JSON format. Some bots even provide an embed visualizer within their dashboards. You can also use this embed visualizer tool which provides visualization for bot and webhook embeds.

  • New members joining decreases
  • Total membership over time grows more slowly or decreases
  • Total joins from the invite link/referrer decreases
  • New members joining increases
  • Total membership over time increases more quickly or decreases more slowly
  • Total joins from the invite link/referrer increases
  • Members remain on your server after joining, decreasing server leaves over time from new members
  • Members are more likely to want to engage with your server prior to joining, and will be more likely to talk or visit multiple channels
  • Can only send messages to a set channel.
  • They can only send messages, not view any.
  • Can send up to 10 embeds per message.
  • Much more flexible as they can do more complex actions similar to what a regular user can do.
  • Bots are able to view and send messages.
  • Only one embed per message is allowed.
  • Can create 10 webhooks per server with the ability to customize each avatar and name.
  • Able to hyperlink any text outside of an embed.
  • Public bots often have a preset avatar and name which cannot be modified by end users.
  • Cannot hyperlink any text in a normal message, must use an embed.
  • Just an endpoint to send data to, no actual hosting is required.
  • No authentication that data sent to webhook is from a trusted source.
  • No authentication that data sent to webhook is from a trusted source.If webhook URL is leaked, only non-permanent problems may occur (e.g. spamming)
  • Easy to change webhook URL if needed.
  • Bots have to be hosted in a secure environment that will need to be kept online all the time, which costs more resources.
  • Bots are authenticated via a token, compromised token can cause severe damage due to their capabilities if they have permissions granted to them by the server owner.
  • However, you can reset the bot token if needed.

Even though this comparison is important for better understanding of both bots and webhooks, it does not mean you should limit yourself to only picking one or the other. Sometimes, bots and webhooks work their best when working together. It’s not uncommon for bots to use webhooks for logging purposes or to distinguish notable messages with a custom avatar and name for that message. Both tools are essential for a server to function properly and make for a powerful combination.

*Unconfigurable filters, these will catch all instances of the trigger, regardless of whether they’re spammed or a single instance

**Gaius also offers an additional NSFW filter as well as standard image spam filtering

***YAGPDB offers link verification via google, anything flagged as unsafe can be removed

****Giselle combines Fast Messages and Repeated Text into one filter

Anti-Spam is integral to running a large private server, or a public server. Spam, by definition, is irrelevant or unsolicited messages. This covers a wide base of things on Discord, there are multiple types of spam a user can engage in. The common forms are listed in the table above. The most common forms of spam are also very typical of raids, those being Fast Messages and Repeated Text. The nature of spam can vary greatly but the vast majority of instances involve a user or users sending lots of messages with the same contents with the intent of disrupting your server.

There are subsets of this spam that many anti-spam filters will be able to catch. If any of the following: Mentions, Links, Invites, Emoji, and Newline Text are spammed repeatedly in one message or spammed repeatedly across several messages, they will provoke most Repeated Text and Fast Messages filters appropriately. Subset filters are still a good thing for your anti-spam filter to contain as you may wish to punish more or less harshly depending on the spam. Namely, Emoji and Links may warrant separate punishments. Spamming 10 links in a single message is inherently worse than having 10 emoji in a message.

Anti-spam will only act on these things contextually, usually in an X in Y fashion where if a user sends, for example, 10 links in 5 seconds, they will be punished to some degree. This could be 10 links in one message, or 1 link in 10 messages. In this respect, some anti-spam filters can act simultaneously as Fast Messages and Repeated Text filters.

Sometimes, spam may happen too quickly for a bot to catch up. There are rate limits in place to stop bots from harming servers that can prevent deletion of individual messages if those messages are being sent too quickly. This can often happen in raids. As such, Fast Messages filters should prevent offenders from sending messages; this can be done via a mute, kick or ban. If you want to protect your server from raids, please read on to the Anti-Raid section of this article.

Text Filters
Text filters allow you to control the types of words and/or links that people are allowed to put in your server. Different bots will provide various ways to filter these things, keeping your chat nice and clean.

*Defaults to banning ALL links

**YAGPDB offers link verification via google, anything flagged as unsafe can be removed

***Setting a catch-all filter with carl will prevent link-specific spam detection

A text filter is integral to a well moderated server. It’s strongly, strongly recommended you use a bot that can filter text based on a blacklist. A Banned words filter can catch links and invites provided http:// and https:// are added to the word blacklist (for all links) or specific full site URLs to block individual websites. In addition, discord.gg can be added to a blacklist to block ALL Discord invites.

A Banned Words filter is integral to running a public server, especially if it’s a Partnered, Community or Verified server, as this level of auto moderation is highly recommended for the server to adhere to the additional guidelines attached to it. Before configuring a filter, it’s a good idea to work out what is and isn’t ok to say in your server, regardless of context. For example, racial slurs are generally unacceptable in almost all servers, regardless of context. Banned word filters often won’t account for context, with an explicit blacklist. For this reason, it’s also important a robust filter also contains whitelisting options. For example, if you add the slur ‘nig’ to your filter and someone mentions the country Nigeria’ they could get in trouble for using an otherwise acceptable word.

Filter immunity may also be important to your server, as there may be individuals who need to discuss the use of banned words, namely members of a moderation team. There may also be channels that allow the usage of otherwise banned words. For example, a serious channel dedicated to discussion of real world issues may require discussions about slurs or other demeaning language, in this exception channel based Immunity is integral to allowing those conversations.

Link filtering is important to servers where sharing links in ‘general’ chats isn’t allowed, or where there are specific channels for sharing such things. This can allow a server to remove links with an appropriate reprimand without treating a transgression with the same severity as they would a user sending a racial slur.

Whitelisting/Blacklisting and templates for links are also a good idea to have. While many servers will use catch-all filters to make sure links stay in specific channels, some links will always be malicious. As such, being able to filter specific links is a good feature, with preset filters (Like the google filter provided by YAGPDB) coming in very handy for protecting your user base without intricate setup however, it is recommended you do configure a custom filter to ensure specific slurs, words etc. that break the rules of your server, aren’t being said.

Invite filtering is equally important in large or public servers where users will attempt to raid, scam or otherwise assault your server with links with the intention of manipulating your user base to join or where unsolicited self-promotion is potentially fruitful. Filtering allows these invites to be recognized, and dealt with more harshly. Some bots may also allow by-server white/blacklisting allowing you to control which servers are ok to share invites to, and which aren’t. A good example of invite filtering usage would be something like a partners channel, where invites to other, closely linked, servers are shared. These servers should be added to an invite whitelist to prevent their deletion.

Anti-Raid
Raids, as defined earlier in this article, are mass-joins of users (often selfbots) with the intent of damaging your server. There are a few methods available to you in order for you to protect your community from this behavior. One method involves gating your server with verification appropriately, as discussed in DMA 301.You can also supplement or supplant the need for verification by using a bot that can detect and/or prevent damage from raids.

Источник статьи: http://discord.com/moderation/151-an-intro-to-the-moderator-ecosystem

210: Moderator Recruitment

One of the most difficult aspects of being a Discord server moderator can be finding new people to help you moderate your community. You need to find individuals that match in personality, mindset, knowledge, availability, and most importantly, trust. While much of this differs between servers and teams, I hope to cover the most important parts as well as giving you an idea of what the common questions are and what to watch out for.

Do You Need More Moderators?

The first thing to ask yourself or your moderator team before bringing in another team member is whether you actually need additional help. For example, a server that provides technical support or assists members in a more personal fashion may require more moderators than a community server for a mobile game even if the number of members is the same. An additional and important factor to consider is moderator burnout.

Placing too many responsibilities on too few moderators can quickly cause members of the team to lose interest and feel like they do not have enough time to commit to moderation. In some cases, it can actually be beneficial to have too many mods rather than too few, but it is important to remember there is no perfect number of moderators to have on your server.

The most important thing to keep in mind when recruiting moderators is the purpose moderators have in your server and the extent to which those duties are (or aren’t) currently being fulfilled. For instance:

  • Are there time periods in your server where moderators are unavailable to answer questions or resolve incidents?
  • Are user reports of bad behavior going unactioned for too long?
  • Is it unfeasible to implement additional automoderator measures to reduce the number of incidents?

You may also have specific duties that you require of your moderators beyond typical server moderation. Be sure to analyze these as well and determine if there is any shortfall between what your mod team needs to do and what it is currently able to do.

An example of what this situation might look like is if your moderators might also be the ones handling technical support requests, or contributing to another site. If you need people for a specific task it might make sense to create a separate role for those people.

Selection Process

If you decide that you do need to select new mods an important part of recruiting new mods is having a well-defined selection process. Here are a few things that you should consider when establishing this process:

  • How are candidates selected? Either recruitment or mod applications
  • How do you vet people that might not be a good fit?
  • How is the current moderation team involved in this decision?
  • What permissions you want to give out to newer staff?

Candidate selection

Selection is a highly subjective topic; some servers accept new members via a vote, some have rules where the decision has to be unanimous, and others are more open. In all cases, it’s important to consider that the person is someone you and your team would be comfortable working with.

There are 3 main ways a candidate might be brought to the mod team for acceptance that can be mixed and matched, but it’s usually recommended to only have 1 official method:

  • The most common method in smaller servers is the owner selecting new mods. This works in the earlier stages, but as the server grows in number of staff it may discourage healthy discussion about that person that may be relevant (like behavior in other communities that might show who that person really is or things that might hurt the reputation of the mod team as a whole).
  • The second most common is having an application form. While this is effective in obtaining the information that you are looking for, it might attract people that just want to be a moderator for the power or status. It will also change their behavior in the main chat as they know they have eyes on them, which might make it harder for the mod team to evaluate how truthful the responses to the form were.
  • The main advantage of this is that it would let you modify the form to find a person for a specific purpose and might include an optional follow-up interview. Be careful about “application floods” and have methods to filter low-quality applications out (like captchas, questions about your server where if you get it wrong it gets automatically rejected, random questions to prevent bots, or small tests like type your timezone in a specific format). You can also provide a basic test of competence, if they can’t manage the simple elements of the form, they won’t manage as mod.
  • Finally, you can have the members of your current moderation team recommend users as candidates. As the user is not aware that they are being assessed for staff, it means that their behavior in chat is unchanged from their typical behavior. With time and observation, this allows you to find the answers to the questions that would have been on your form along with extra red or green flags. It also allows you to find people that would never apply for staff in a form due to reluctance or lack of confidence, but that would be a great fit for your moderation team.
  • The drawbacks to this process is that it tends to introduce more work in the vetting process, as it’s not as linear as an application form. Additionally, it might result in a more limited scope of candidates.

Separate instructional & verification channels

@everyone role

✔ Read Messages in both channels

❌ Add Reactions in both channels
✔ Read Message History in instructional

❌ Send Messages in instructional

✔ Send Messages in verification
❌ Read Message History in verification

❌ Read Messages in both channels

❌ Add Reactions in both channels

Combined channel
@everyone role

✔ Read Messages
✔ Read Message History

Separate instructional & verification channels

@everyone role

✔ Read Messages in both channels

❌ Add Reactions in both channels
✔ Read Message History in instructional

❌ Send Messages in instructional

✔ Send Messages in verification
❌ Read Message History in verification

❌ Read Messages in both channels

❌ Add Reactions in both channels

Combined channel
@everyone role

✔ Read Messages
✔ Read Message History*

*Unless you are using the channel description for verification instructions rather than an automatic greeter message.

If you want to use the remove unverified role method, you will need a bot that can automatically assign a role to a user when they join.

Verification Actions
Once you decide whether you want to add or remove a role, you need to decide how you want that action to take place. Generally, this is done by typing a bot command in a channel, typing a bot command in a DM, or clicking on a reaction. The differences between these methods are shown below.

In order to use the command in channel method, you will need to instruct your users to remove the Unverified role or to add the Verified role to themselves.

Vetting

An important consideration when selecting moderators is determining if the candidate is able to do their job effectively. A lot of server owners pick their own friends to mod their servers, which might result in personality clashes, unproductive discussions about rules, or inactive mods that can’t meaningfully contribute to discussions.

A good question to ask yourself is: “Do I trust this person?” For example, you might not want to suggest anyone that has not been actively helping for at least a year. During that year you can come to know the person, and it can help you determine if they are more interested in the good of the community as a whole and not just a role. You are looking for experience and willingness to improve the community.

External research can also be beneficial, such as a quick Google search that could show other communities this person might be involved with or asking for their experience on the application form. If you find them in moderation roles in other communities, perhaps it may be worth speaking to the leadership of other communities the user is involved in to get their opinion on that potential moderator’s work ethic and general attitude.

Ascertaining someone’s motive for becoming a moderator is another thing to consider. Think about why they want to be involved in your community in this way, what is motivating them. Some points to think about include:

  • Are they just trying to get more status?
  • Do they have new ideas or contacts, but don’t necessarily need to be part of the staff team?
  • Do they have a history of problems with specific users that might bias their decision making? Is that a deal breaker or do they seem capable of deferring those connections to other moderators who are uninvolved?

Be mindful that asking the user for their motives directly or giving any hints about potential promotions might change their behavior. Instead focus on looking for clues on how they interact with the rest of the community in order to determine their reasons.

That being said, here are some things to keep in mind when deciding to vet a potential mod. While vetting users in this manner may be a better fit for larger communities, it’s maybe less applicable to smaller, more intimate servers. It’s worth noting this is an example and that the vetting process differs depending upon the size of the server and the servers’ needs, but regardless of server size candidates should show a dedicated and long-term invested interest and desire to help in the community.

After you’ve made your selections and you (and your mod team!) are comfortable with having them join the team, it’s time to consider how to onboard them.

Markdown is also supported in an embed. Here is an image to showcase an example of these properties:

Example image to showcase the elements of an embed
An important thing to note is that embeds also have their limitations, which are set by the API. Here are some of the most important ones you need to know:

An important thing to note is that embeds also have their limitations, which are set by the API. Here are some of the most important ones you need to know:

  • Embed titles are limited to 256 characters
  • Embed descriptions are limited to 2048 characters
  • There can be up to 25 fields
  • The name of a field is limited to 256 characters and its value to 1024 characters
  • The footer text is limited to 2048 characters
  • The author name is limited to 256 characters
  • In addition, the sum of all characters in an embed structure must not exceed 6000 characters
  • A webhook can have 10 embeds per message
  • A webhook can only send 30 messages per minute

If you feel like experimenting even further you should take a look at the full list of limitations provided by Discord here.

It’s very important to keep in mind that when you are writing an embed, it should be in JSON format. Some bots even provide an embed visualizer within their dashboards. You can also use this embed visualizer tool which provides visualization for bot and webhook embeds.

Onboarding

One of the most important parts of bringing new people is the onboarding process. A well thought out process can make people effective faster, with minimal misunderstandings and mistakes from the onset. Utilizing the techniques and implementing the tips in 302: Developing Moderator Guidelines can help you create a guideline for your moderation team that makes onboarding easier for all parties involved.

Conclusion

The efforts put into the early stages of moderator management pay off in multitudes down the line. Having a deliberate and carefully thought out process for selecting your mods ensures that your moderation team grows in a stable and effective way with your server. The foundation of any good community is a well moderated community, and the foundation for a well moderated community lies in having great moderators.

  • New members joining decreases
  • Total membership over time grows more slowly or decreases
  • Total joins from the invite link/referrer decreases
  • New members joining increases
  • Total membership over time increases more quickly or decreases more slowly
  • Total joins from the invite link/referrer increases
  • Members remain on your server after joining, decreasing server leaves over time from new members
  • Members are more likely to want to engage with your server prior to joining, and will be more likely to talk or visit multiple channels
  • Can only send messages to a set channel.
  • They can only send messages, not view any.
  • Can send up to 10 embeds per message.
  • Much more flexible as they can do more complex actions similar to what a regular user can do.
  • Bots are able to view and send messages.
  • Only one embed per message is allowed.
  • Can create 10 webhooks per server with the ability to customize each avatar and name.
  • Able to hyperlink any text outside of an embed.
  • Public bots often have a preset avatar and name which cannot be modified by end users.
  • Cannot hyperlink any text in a normal message, must use an embed.
  • Just an endpoint to send data to, no actual hosting is required.
  • No authentication that data sent to webhook is from a trusted source.
  • No authentication that data sent to webhook is from a trusted source.If webhook URL is leaked, only non-permanent problems may occur (e.g. spamming)
  • Easy to change webhook URL if needed.
  • Bots have to be hosted in a secure environment that will need to be kept online all the time, which costs more resources.
  • Bots are authenticated via a token, compromised token can cause severe damage due to their capabilities if they have permissions granted to them by the server owner.
  • However, you can reset the bot token if needed.

Even though this comparison is important for better understanding of both bots and webhooks, it does not mean you should limit yourself to only picking one or the other. Sometimes, bots and webhooks work their best when working together. It’s not uncommon for bots to use webhooks for logging purposes or to distinguish notable messages with a custom avatar and name for that message. Both tools are essential for a server to function properly and make for a powerful combination.

*Unconfigurable filters, these will catch all instances of the trigger, regardless of whether they’re spammed or a single instance

**Gaius also offers an additional NSFW filter as well as standard image spam filtering

***YAGPDB offers link verification via google, anything flagged as unsafe can be removed

****Giselle combines Fast Messages and Repeated Text into one filter

Anti-Spam is integral to running a large private server, or a public server. Spam, by definition, is irrelevant or unsolicited messages. This covers a wide base of things on Discord, there are multiple types of spam a user can engage in. The common forms are listed in the table above. The most common forms of spam are also very typical of raids, those being Fast Messages and Repeated Text. The nature of spam can vary greatly but the vast majority of instances involve a user or users sending lots of messages with the same contents with the intent of disrupting your server.

There are subsets of this spam that many anti-spam filters will be able to catch. If any of the following: Mentions, Links, Invites, Emoji, and Newline Text are spammed repeatedly in one message or spammed repeatedly across several messages, they will provoke most Repeated Text and Fast Messages filters appropriately. Subset filters are still a good thing for your anti-spam filter to contain as you may wish to punish more or less harshly depending on the spam. Namely, Emoji and Links may warrant separate punishments. Spamming 10 links in a single message is inherently worse than having 10 emoji in a message.

Anti-spam will only act on these things contextually, usually in an X in Y fashion where if a user sends, for example, 10 links in 5 seconds, they will be punished to some degree. This could be 10 links in one message, or 1 link in 10 messages. In this respect, some anti-spam filters can act simultaneously as Fast Messages and Repeated Text filters.

Sometimes, spam may happen too quickly for a bot to catch up. There are rate limits in place to stop bots from harming servers that can prevent deletion of individual messages if those messages are being sent too quickly. This can often happen in raids. As such, Fast Messages filters should prevent offenders from sending messages; this can be done via a mute, kick or ban. If you want to protect your server from raids, please read on to the Anti-Raid section of this article.

Text Filters
Text filters allow you to control the types of words and/or links that people are allowed to put in your server. Different bots will provide various ways to filter these things, keeping your chat nice and clean.

*Defaults to banning ALL links

**YAGPDB offers link verification via google, anything flagged as unsafe can be removed

***Setting a catch-all filter with carl will prevent link-specific spam detection

A text filter is integral to a well moderated server. It’s strongly, strongly recommended you use a bot that can filter text based on a blacklist. A Banned words filter can catch links and invites provided http:// and https:// are added to the word blacklist (for all links) or specific full site URLs to block individual websites. In addition, discord.gg can be added to a blacklist to block ALL Discord invites.

A Banned Words filter is integral to running a public server, especially if it’s a Partnered, Community or Verified server, as this level of auto moderation is highly recommended for the server to adhere to the additional guidelines attached to it. Before configuring a filter, it’s a good idea to work out what is and isn’t ok to say in your server, regardless of context. For example, racial slurs are generally unacceptable in almost all servers, regardless of context. Banned word filters often won’t account for context, with an explicit blacklist. For this reason, it’s also important a robust filter also contains whitelisting options. For example, if you add the slur ‘nig’ to your filter and someone mentions the country Nigeria’ they could get in trouble for using an otherwise acceptable word.

Filter immunity may also be important to your server, as there may be individuals who need to discuss the use of banned words, namely members of a moderation team. There may also be channels that allow the usage of otherwise banned words. For example, a serious channel dedicated to discussion of real world issues may require discussions about slurs or other demeaning language, in this exception channel based Immunity is integral to allowing those conversations.

Link filtering is important to servers where sharing links in ‘general’ chats isn’t allowed, or where there are specific channels for sharing such things. This can allow a server to remove links with an appropriate reprimand without treating a transgression with the same severity as they would a user sending a racial slur.

Whitelisting/Blacklisting and templates for links are also a good idea to have. While many servers will use catch-all filters to make sure links stay in specific channels, some links will always be malicious. As such, being able to filter specific links is a good feature, with preset filters (Like the google filter provided by YAGPDB) coming in very handy for protecting your user base without intricate setup however, it is recommended you do configure a custom filter to ensure specific slurs, words etc. that break the rules of your server, aren’t being said.

Invite filtering is equally important in large or public servers where users will attempt to raid, scam or otherwise assault your server with links with the intention of manipulating your user base to join or where unsolicited self-promotion is potentially fruitful. Filtering allows these invites to be recognized, and dealt with more harshly. Some bots may also allow by-server white/blacklisting allowing you to control which servers are ok to share invites to, and which aren’t. A good example of invite filtering usage would be something like a partners channel, where invites to other, closely linked, servers are shared. These servers should be added to an invite whitelist to prevent their deletion.

Anti-Raid
Raids, as defined earlier in this article, are mass-joins of users (often selfbots) with the intent of damaging your server. There are a few methods available to you in order for you to protect your community from this behavior. One method involves gating your server with verification appropriately, as discussed in DMA 301.You can also supplement or supplant the need for verification by using a bot that can detect and/or prevent damage from raids.

Источник статьи: http://discord.com/moderation/1500000177601-210-moderator-recruitment

Introduction

The content of the Discord Moderator Academy is organized based on complexity. Articles start with the basics, and the later articles are some of the most advanced topics moderators may face. Here is the breakdown:

100: Basics

These resources help answer basic questions on how to build and moderate a community, whether they are brand new to Discord or need some helpful reminders.

200: Setup and Function

Once the foundation is set, it is time to make your community even more enticing by leveraging Discord’s features to manage moderation processes and your team, and to build a compelling community full of interesting channels and events to participate in.

300: Advanced Community Management

Expert moderators face challenges too! These resources are for anyone seeking to learn more about the intricacies of community management and making sound moderation decisions.

Separate instructional & verification channels

@everyone role

✔ Read Messages in both channels

❌ Add Reactions in both channels
✔ Read Message History in instructional

❌ Send Messages in instructional

✔ Send Messages in verification
❌ Read Message History in verification

❌ Read Messages in both channels

❌ Add Reactions in both channels

Combined channel
@everyone role

✔ Read Messages
✔ Read Message History

Separate instructional & verification channels

@everyone role

✔ Read Messages in both channels

❌ Add Reactions in both channels
✔ Read Message History in instructional

❌ Send Messages in instructional

✔ Send Messages in verification
❌ Read Message History in verification

❌ Read Messages in both channels

❌ Add Reactions in both channels

Combined channel
@everyone role

✔ Read Messages
✔ Read Message History*

*Unless you are using the channel description for verification instructions rather than an automatic greeter message.

If you want to use the remove unverified role method, you will need a bot that can automatically assign a role to a user when they join.

Verification Actions
Once you decide whether you want to add or remove a role, you need to decide how you want that action to take place. Generally, this is done by typing a bot command in a channel, typing a bot command in a DM, or clicking on a reaction. The differences between these methods are shown below.

In order to use the command in channel method, you will need to instruct your users to remove the Unverified role or to add the Verified role to themselves.

400: Moderation Seminars

Advanced content for deep dives into moderation that address overarching philosophy and strategy.

Markdown is also supported in an embed. Here is an image to showcase an example of these properties:

Example image to showcase the elements of an embed
An important thing to note is that embeds also have their limitations, which are set by the API. Here are some of the most important ones you need to know:

An important thing to note is that embeds also have their limitations, which are set by the API. Here are some of the most important ones you need to know:

  • Embed titles are limited to 256 characters
  • Embed descriptions are limited to 2048 characters
  • There can be up to 25 fields
  • The name of a field is limited to 256 characters and its value to 1024 characters
  • The footer text is limited to 2048 characters
  • The author name is limited to 256 characters
  • In addition, the sum of all characters in an embed structure must not exceed 6000 characters
  • A webhook can have 10 embeds per message
  • A webhook can only send 30 messages per minute

If you feel like experimenting even further you should take a look at the full list of limitations provided by Discord here.

It’s very important to keep in mind that when you are writing an embed, it should be in JSON format. Some bots even provide an embed visualizer within their dashboards. You can also use this embed visualizer tool which provides visualization for bot and webhook embeds.

500: Graduate Courses

For those interested in learning about concepts that go beyond the scope of moderation in practice. Delve into the realm of community dynamics and moderation in academic abstract.

Author Credits

The Discord Moderator Academy was carefully constructed by many moderators in collaboration with Discord. Check out the credits for acknowledgments.

  • New members joining decreases
  • Total membership over time grows more slowly or decreases
  • Total joins from the invite link/referrer decreases
  • New members joining increases
  • Total membership over time increases more quickly or decreases more slowly
  • Total joins from the invite link/referrer increases
  • Members remain on your server after joining, decreasing server leaves over time from new members
  • Members are more likely to want to engage with your server prior to joining, and will be more likely to talk or visit multiple channels
  • Can only send messages to a set channel.
  • They can only send messages, not view any.
  • Can send up to 10 embeds per message.
  • Much more flexible as they can do more complex actions similar to what a regular user can do.
  • Bots are able to view and send messages.
  • Only one embed per message is allowed.
  • Can create 10 webhooks per server with the ability to customize each avatar and name.
  • Able to hyperlink any text outside of an embed.
  • Public bots often have a preset avatar and name which cannot be modified by end users.
  • Cannot hyperlink any text in a normal message, must use an embed.
  • Just an endpoint to send data to, no actual hosting is required.
  • No authentication that data sent to webhook is from a trusted source.
  • No authentication that data sent to webhook is from a trusted source.If webhook URL is leaked, only non-permanent problems may occur (e.g. spamming)
  • Easy to change webhook URL if needed.
  • Bots have to be hosted in a secure environment that will need to be kept online all the time, which costs more resources.
  • Bots are authenticated via a token, compromised token can cause severe damage due to their capabilities if they have permissions granted to them by the server owner.
  • However, you can reset the bot token if needed.

Even though this comparison is important for better understanding of both bots and webhooks, it does not mean you should limit yourself to only picking one or the other. Sometimes, bots and webhooks work their best when working together. It’s not uncommon for bots to use webhooks for logging purposes or to distinguish notable messages with a custom avatar and name for that message. Both tools are essential for a server to function properly and make for a powerful combination.

*Unconfigurable filters, these will catch all instances of the trigger, regardless of whether they’re spammed or a single instance

**Gaius also offers an additional NSFW filter as well as standard image spam filtering

***YAGPDB offers link verification via google, anything flagged as unsafe can be removed

****Giselle combines Fast Messages and Repeated Text into one filter

Anti-Spam is integral to running a large private server, or a public server. Spam, by definition, is irrelevant or unsolicited messages. This covers a wide base of things on Discord, there are multiple types of spam a user can engage in. The common forms are listed in the table above. The most common forms of spam are also very typical of raids, those being Fast Messages and Repeated Text. The nature of spam can vary greatly but the vast majority of instances involve a user or users sending lots of messages with the same contents with the intent of disrupting your server.

There are subsets of this spam that many anti-spam filters will be able to catch. If any of the following: Mentions, Links, Invites, Emoji, and Newline Text are spammed repeatedly in one message or spammed repeatedly across several messages, they will provoke most Repeated Text and Fast Messages filters appropriately. Subset filters are still a good thing for your anti-spam filter to contain as you may wish to punish more or less harshly depending on the spam. Namely, Emoji and Links may warrant separate punishments. Spamming 10 links in a single message is inherently worse than having 10 emoji in a message.

Anti-spam will only act on these things contextually, usually in an X in Y fashion where if a user sends, for example, 10 links in 5 seconds, they will be punished to some degree. This could be 10 links in one message, or 1 link in 10 messages. In this respect, some anti-spam filters can act simultaneously as Fast Messages and Repeated Text filters.

Sometimes, spam may happen too quickly for a bot to catch up. There are rate limits in place to stop bots from harming servers that can prevent deletion of individual messages if those messages are being sent too quickly. This can often happen in raids. As such, Fast Messages filters should prevent offenders from sending messages; this can be done via a mute, kick or ban. If you want to protect your server from raids, please read on to the Anti-Raid section of this article.

Text Filters
Text filters allow you to control the types of words and/or links that people are allowed to put in your server. Different bots will provide various ways to filter these things, keeping your chat nice and clean.

*Defaults to banning ALL links

**YAGPDB offers link verification via google, anything flagged as unsafe can be removed

***Setting a catch-all filter with carl will prevent link-specific spam detection

A text filter is integral to a well moderated server. It’s strongly, strongly recommended you use a bot that can filter text based on a blacklist. A Banned words filter can catch links and invites provided http:// and https:// are added to the word blacklist (for all links) or specific full site URLs to block individual websites. In addition, discord.gg can be added to a blacklist to block ALL Discord invites.

A Banned Words filter is integral to running a public server, especially if it’s a Partnered, Community or Verified server, as this level of auto moderation is highly recommended for the server to adhere to the additional guidelines attached to it. Before configuring a filter, it’s a good idea to work out what is and isn’t ok to say in your server, regardless of context. For example, racial slurs are generally unacceptable in almost all servers, regardless of context. Banned word filters often won’t account for context, with an explicit blacklist. For this reason, it’s also important a robust filter also contains whitelisting options. For example, if you add the slur ‘nig’ to your filter and someone mentions the country Nigeria’ they could get in trouble for using an otherwise acceptable word.

Filter immunity may also be important to your server, as there may be individuals who need to discuss the use of banned words, namely members of a moderation team. There may also be channels that allow the usage of otherwise banned words. For example, a serious channel dedicated to discussion of real world issues may require discussions about slurs or other demeaning language, in this exception channel based Immunity is integral to allowing those conversations.

Link filtering is important to servers where sharing links in ‘general’ chats isn’t allowed, or where there are specific channels for sharing such things. This can allow a server to remove links with an appropriate reprimand without treating a transgression with the same severity as they would a user sending a racial slur.

Whitelisting/Blacklisting and templates for links are also a good idea to have. While many servers will use catch-all filters to make sure links stay in specific channels, some links will always be malicious. As such, being able to filter specific links is a good feature, with preset filters (Like the google filter provided by YAGPDB) coming in very handy for protecting your user base without intricate setup however, it is recommended you do configure a custom filter to ensure specific slurs, words etc. that break the rules of your server, aren’t being said.

Invite filtering is equally important in large or public servers where users will attempt to raid, scam or otherwise assault your server with links with the intention of manipulating your user base to join or where unsolicited self-promotion is potentially fruitful. Filtering allows these invites to be recognized, and dealt with more harshly. Some bots may also allow by-server white/blacklisting allowing you to control which servers are ok to share invites to, and which aren’t. A good example of invite filtering usage would be something like a partners channel, where invites to other, closely linked, servers are shared. These servers should be added to an invite whitelist to prevent their deletion.

Anti-Raid
Raids, as defined earlier in this article, are mass-joins of users (often selfbots) with the intent of damaging your server. There are a few methods available to you in order for you to protect your community from this behavior. One method involves gating your server with verification appropriately, as discussed in DMA 301.You can also supplement or supplant the need for verification by using a bot that can detect and/or prevent damage from raids.

Источник статьи: http://canary.discord.com/moderation/introduction

Author Credits

The Discord Moderator Academy would not have been possible without the contributions of the following moderators:

Contributing Editor

Basics

  • 100: Intro to the Discord Moderator Academy by Lili#4321
  • 103: Basic Channel Setup by joe#6000
  • 104: How to Report Content to Discord by GroovyUnicyclist#1612
  • 110: Moderator Etiquette by Just Harmonee#1030
  • 111: Your Responsibilities as a Moderator by GroovyUnicyclist#1612
  • 151: An Intro to the Moderator Ecosystem by Grammsay#0001

Setup and Function

  • 201: Permissions on Discord by NaviKing#3820
  • 202: Handling Difficult Scenarios by Drew 👻#2567
  • 203: Developing Server Rules by NaviKing#3820
  • 204: Ban Appeals by Skwaleks#2794, EJH2#0330, and Sylveon#1337
  • 205: Utilizing Role Colors by binchlord#0998
  • 206: Best Practices for Reporting Tools by Klosjaarrr#1337
  • 207: Server Information and Announcement Channels by Naviking#3820
  • 208: Channel Categories and Names by Naviking#3820
  • 210: Moderator Recruitment by urielsalis#0001
  • 211: Creating Moderation Team Channels by Lili#4321
  • 231: Fundamentals of Family-Friendly Servers by Lili#4321
  • 241: Securing Your Discord Account by Naviking#3820

Separate instructional & verification channels

@everyone role

✔ Read Messages in both channels

❌ Add Reactions in both channels
✔ Read Message History in instructional

❌ Send Messages in instructional

✔ Send Messages in verification
❌ Read Message History in verification

❌ Read Messages in both channels

❌ Add Reactions in both channels

Combined channel
@everyone role

✔ Read Messages
✔ Read Message History

Separate instructional & verification channels

@everyone role

✔ Read Messages in both channels

❌ Add Reactions in both channels
✔ Read Message History in instructional

❌ Send Messages in instructional

✔ Send Messages in verification
❌ Read Message History in verification

❌ Read Messages in both channels

❌ Add Reactions in both channels

Combined channel
@everyone role

✔ Read Messages
✔ Read Message History*

*Unless you are using the channel description for verification instructions rather than an automatic greeter message.

If you want to use the remove unverified role method, you will need a bot that can automatically assign a role to a user when they join.

Verification Actions
Once you decide whether you want to add or remove a role, you need to decide how you want that action to take place. Generally, this is done by typing a bot command in a channel, typing a bot command in a DM, or clicking on a reaction. The differences between these methods are shown below.

In order to use the command in channel method, you will need to instruct your users to remove the Unverified role or to add the Verified role to themselves.

Advanced Community Management

  • 301: Implementing Verification Gates by NaviKing#3820
  • 302: Developing Moderator Guidelines by NaviKing#3820
  • 303: Facilitating Positive Environments by Deku ♡#1313
  • 304: Moderating Safely and Security by Grammsay#0001 and Trance#6758
  • 310: Managing Moderation Teams by Dorrn#0001
  • 311: Understanding and Avoiding Moderator Burnout by Brea#0001
  • 312: Internal Conflict Resolution by Klosjaarrr#1337
  • 313: How to Moderate Voice Channels by GroovyUnicyclist#1612
  • 314: Training and Onboarding New Moderators by Just Harmonee#1030 and Klosjaarrr#1337
  • 321: Auto Moderation in Discord by Panley#8008
  • 322: Using Webhooks and Embeds by Phyre#0003 and Pepe#0002
  • 323: Using XP Systems by Pepe#0002
  • 324: Using Modmail Bots by Trance#6758
  • 331: Community Engagement by Pepe#0002
  • 332: Fostering Healthy Communities by Purpzie#0001
  • 333: Planning Community Events by BeeAPeach#0001
  • 334: Community Partnerships by Tunic Fox#1312
  • 341: Understanding Your Community Through Insights by NaviKing#3820
  • 345: Best Practices for Moderating Content Creation by Lili#4321

Markdown is also supported in an embed. Here is an image to showcase an example of these properties:

Example image to showcase the elements of an embed
An important thing to note is that embeds also have their limitations, which are set by the API. Here are some of the most important ones you need to know:

An important thing to note is that embeds also have their limitations, which are set by the API. Here are some of the most important ones you need to know:

  • Embed titles are limited to 256 characters
  • Embed descriptions are limited to 2048 characters
  • There can be up to 25 fields
  • The name of a field is limited to 256 characters and its value to 1024 characters
  • The footer text is limited to 2048 characters
  • The author name is limited to 256 characters
  • In addition, the sum of all characters in an embed structure must not exceed 6000 characters
  • A webhook can have 10 embeds per message
  • A webhook can only send 30 messages per minute

If you feel like experimenting even further you should take a look at the full list of limitations provided by Discord here.

It’s very important to keep in mind that when you are writing an embed, it should be in JSON format. Some bots even provide an embed visualizer within their dashboards. You can also use this embed visualizer tool which provides visualization for bot and webhook embeds.

Moderation Seminars

  • 401: Transparency in Moderation by NaviKing#3820
  • 402: Confidentiality in Moderation by Valcrye#0001
  • 403: Sensitive Topics by Tunic Fox#1312 and binchlord#0998
  • 404: Considering Mental Health in Your Community by Grammsay#0001 and Tunic Fox#1312
  • 405: Practicalities of Moderating Adult Channels by binchlord#0998
  • 407: Managing Exponential Membership Growth by binchlord#0998
  • 431: Ethical Community Growth by Naviking#3820
  • 432: Internationalization of a Community by Just Harmonee#1030
  • 441: Community Governance Structures by Just Harmonee#1030 and Klosjaarrr#1337
  • 442: Using Insights to Improve Community Growth and Engagement by NaviKing#3820
  • 443: Ban Evasion and Advanced Harassment by AlanFoster#0001
  • 444: Managing Interpersonal Relationships by Mako#2511 and General Anubis#6342
  • 451: Reddit x Discord by Delite#0001 and tiz#1430
  • 452: Twitch x Discord by AlanFoster#0001
  • 453: Patreon x Discord by Andeh#0001
  • 455: Schools x Discord by Skwaleks#2794 and Maartje Eyskens#0001
  • 459: Bringing Other Communities to Discord by by Andeh#0001 and urielsalis#0001

Graduate Courses

  • New members joining decreases
  • Total membership over time grows more slowly or decreases
  • Total joins from the invite link/referrer decreases
  • New members joining increases
  • Total membership over time increases more quickly or decreases more slowly
  • Total joins from the invite link/referrer increases
  • Members remain on your server after joining, decreasing server leaves over time from new members
  • Members are more likely to want to engage with your server prior to joining, and will be more likely to talk or visit multiple channels
  • Can only send messages to a set channel.
  • They can only send messages, not view any.
  • Can send up to 10 embeds per message.
  • Much more flexible as they can do more complex actions similar to what a regular user can do.
  • Bots are able to view and send messages.
  • Only one embed per message is allowed.
  • Can create 10 webhooks per server with the ability to customize each avatar and name.
  • Able to hyperlink any text outside of an embed.
  • Public bots often have a preset avatar and name which cannot be modified by end users.
  • Cannot hyperlink any text in a normal message, must use an embed.
  • Just an endpoint to send data to, no actual hosting is required.
  • No authentication that data sent to webhook is from a trusted source.
  • No authentication that data sent to webhook is from a trusted source.If webhook URL is leaked, only non-permanent problems may occur (e.g. spamming)
  • Easy to change webhook URL if needed.
  • Bots have to be hosted in a secure environment that will need to be kept online all the time, which costs more resources.
  • Bots are authenticated via a token, compromised token can cause severe damage due to their capabilities if they have permissions granted to them by the server owner.
  • However, you can reset the bot token if needed.

Even though this comparison is important for better understanding of both bots and webhooks, it does not mean you should limit yourself to only picking one or the other. Sometimes, bots and webhooks work their best when working together. It’s not uncommon for bots to use webhooks for logging purposes or to distinguish notable messages with a custom avatar and name for that message. Both tools are essential for a server to function properly and make for a powerful combination.

*Unconfigurable filters, these will catch all instances of the trigger, regardless of whether they’re spammed or a single instance

**Gaius also offers an additional NSFW filter as well as standard image spam filtering

***YAGPDB offers link verification via google, anything flagged as unsafe can be removed

****Giselle combines Fast Messages and Repeated Text into one filter

Anti-Spam is integral to running a large private server, or a public server. Spam, by definition, is irrelevant or unsolicited messages. This covers a wide base of things on Discord, there are multiple types of spam a user can engage in. The common forms are listed in the table above. The most common forms of spam are also very typical of raids, those being Fast Messages and Repeated Text. The nature of spam can vary greatly but the vast majority of instances involve a user or users sending lots of messages with the same contents with the intent of disrupting your server.

There are subsets of this spam that many anti-spam filters will be able to catch. If any of the following: Mentions, Links, Invites, Emoji, and Newline Text are spammed repeatedly in one message or spammed repeatedly across several messages, they will provoke most Repeated Text and Fast Messages filters appropriately. Subset filters are still a good thing for your anti-spam filter to contain as you may wish to punish more or less harshly depending on the spam. Namely, Emoji and Links may warrant separate punishments. Spamming 10 links in a single message is inherently worse than having 10 emoji in a message.

Anti-spam will only act on these things contextually, usually in an X in Y fashion where if a user sends, for example, 10 links in 5 seconds, they will be punished to some degree. This could be 10 links in one message, or 1 link in 10 messages. In this respect, some anti-spam filters can act simultaneously as Fast Messages and Repeated Text filters.

Sometimes, spam may happen too quickly for a bot to catch up. There are rate limits in place to stop bots from harming servers that can prevent deletion of individual messages if those messages are being sent too quickly. This can often happen in raids. As such, Fast Messages filters should prevent offenders from sending messages; this can be done via a mute, kick or ban. If you want to protect your server from raids, please read on to the Anti-Raid section of this article.

Text Filters
Text filters allow you to control the types of words and/or links that people are allowed to put in your server. Different bots will provide various ways to filter these things, keeping your chat nice and clean.

*Defaults to banning ALL links

**YAGPDB offers link verification via google, anything flagged as unsafe can be removed

***Setting a catch-all filter with carl will prevent link-specific spam detection

A text filter is integral to a well moderated server. It’s strongly, strongly recommended you use a bot that can filter text based on a blacklist. A Banned words filter can catch links and invites provided http:// and https:// are added to the word blacklist (for all links) or specific full site URLs to block individual websites. In addition, discord.gg can be added to a blacklist to block ALL Discord invites.

A Banned Words filter is integral to running a public server, especially if it’s a Partnered, Community or Verified server, as this level of auto moderation is highly recommended for the server to adhere to the additional guidelines attached to it. Before configuring a filter, it’s a good idea to work out what is and isn’t ok to say in your server, regardless of context. For example, racial slurs are generally unacceptable in almost all servers, regardless of context. Banned word filters often won’t account for context, with an explicit blacklist. For this reason, it’s also important a robust filter also contains whitelisting options. For example, if you add the slur ‘nig’ to your filter and someone mentions the country Nigeria’ they could get in trouble for using an otherwise acceptable word.

Filter immunity may also be important to your server, as there may be individuals who need to discuss the use of banned words, namely members of a moderation team. There may also be channels that allow the usage of otherwise banned words. For example, a serious channel dedicated to discussion of real world issues may require discussions about slurs or other demeaning language, in this exception channel based Immunity is integral to allowing those conversations.

Link filtering is important to servers where sharing links in ‘general’ chats isn’t allowed, or where there are specific channels for sharing such things. This can allow a server to remove links with an appropriate reprimand without treating a transgression with the same severity as they would a user sending a racial slur.

Whitelisting/Blacklisting and templates for links are also a good idea to have. While many servers will use catch-all filters to make sure links stay in specific channels, some links will always be malicious. As such, being able to filter specific links is a good feature, with preset filters (Like the google filter provided by YAGPDB) coming in very handy for protecting your user base without intricate setup however, it is recommended you do configure a custom filter to ensure specific slurs, words etc. that break the rules of your server, aren’t being said.

Invite filtering is equally important in large or public servers where users will attempt to raid, scam or otherwise assault your server with links with the intention of manipulating your user base to join or where unsolicited self-promotion is potentially fruitful. Filtering allows these invites to be recognized, and dealt with more harshly. Some bots may also allow by-server white/blacklisting allowing you to control which servers are ok to share invites to, and which aren’t. A good example of invite filtering usage would be something like a partners channel, where invites to other, closely linked, servers are shared. These servers should be added to an invite whitelist to prevent their deletion.

Anti-Raid
Raids, as defined earlier in this article, are mass-joins of users (often selfbots) with the intent of damaging your server. There are a few methods available to you in order for you to protect your community from this behavior. One method involves gating your server with verification appropriately, as discussed in DMA 301.You can also supplement or supplant the need for verification by using a bot that can detect and/or prevent damage from raids.

Источник статьи: http://discord.com/moderation/360059013394-author-credits

Как стать модератором Discord: условия подачи заявки, сертификация

В Дискорде можно наделять определенными правами участников сервера. Для этого им присваивают роли, которые подразумевают выполнение конкретных обязанностей. Но много возможностей на сервере имеет модератор. Разберемся, какие функции он выполняет, как им стать, и каким требованиям надо соответствовать.

Обязанности модератора в Дискорде

Каждый участник, который наделен определенными правами, должен выполнять поставленные задачи. Среди основных обязанностей модератора выделим следующие:

  • оказание помощи пользователям сервера, предоставление ответов на их вопросы;
  • фильтрация ботов и спам-аккаунтов, проверка участников;
  • контроль за их поведением;
  • блокировка пользователей в случае нарушений правил сообщества;
  • устранение конфликтных ситуаций;
  • поддержание общего порядка.

К сведению! Модератор сам должен не нарушать правила сервера и проекта в целом.

Как стать модератором в Discord: пошаговое руководство

В Дискорде любой пользователь может создать сообщество по своим интересам. Но ключевую роль здесь играет модератор. Если вы хотите им стать, то для начала изучите материалы по управлению сообществом. После этого подайте заявку и получите сертифицированную роль. Схема будет выглядеть следующим образом:

  1. Зайдите на сайт https://discord.com.
  2. В нижней части страницы найдите блок «Политика».
  3. Выберите раздел «Модерация».
  4. Изучите учебную программу Академии модерации. Она сформирована таким образом, что первые материалы посвящены основам, а последние – сложным темам, с которыми вы можете столкнуться в процессе работы.
  5. После того как ознакомитесь со всей информацией, сдайте экзамен от разработчиков, который будет представлен в виде теста. Ссылка на него есть в конце каждой ознакомительной статьи.
  6. Перед прохождением тестирования заполните сведения о себе, указав ID и контактные данные.
  7. Когда закончите отвечать на вопросы, отправьте результаты и ожидайте ответа разработчиков.
  8. Если вы успешно пройдете тестирование, то вам пришлют инструкцию с дальнейшими указаниями.
  9. Вы должны будете пройти стажировку, которая длится 3 — 4 месяца. Если за это время покажете себя активным участником, то получите сертифицированный значок модератора.
  10. Также на сторонних ресурсах вы можете увидеть объявления, где требуются модераторы в Дискорд. По желанию отправьте заявку на рассмотрение.

Обратите внимание! Результаты тестирования разработчики могут оценивать несколько недель. Если с первого раза его не пройдете, то у вас будет возможность сдать его повторно.

Требования, предъявляемые к модератору

Если вы решили стать модератором, то учитывайте требования, которые предъявляют к кандидатам. Среди них:

  • наличие свободного времени;
  • готовность к совершенствованию, изучению новых способов сделать сервер лучше;
  • пунктуальность и ответственность;
  • умение пользоваться игровыми ресурсами;
  • трудолюбие и общительность;
  • умение быстро осваивать новую информацию;
  • стрессоустойчивость;
  • грамотная устная и письменная речь;
  • знание всех команд сервера;
  • желание помогать участникам сообщества.

Важно! Если ваша деятельность в качестве модератора будет неактивной, или вы не сможете справляться с поставленными задачами, то вашу должность передадут другому пользователю.

Источник статьи: http://discord-online.ru/stat-moderatorom.html

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